Mixing or matching? Hearing or missing new business opportunities.

Should we mix or match when running focus groups for you?

Mixing different types of people in a group can expose new business opportunities – or can silence the exposure of that same opportunity.

Part of our skill in identifying new business opportunities for you comes from deciding whether to mix or to match.

Should we mix different types of people in a focus group?

As an example, while men see themselves as silent, stoic and strong when ill (man-flu excepted), mixing the well and the ill in focus groups found that business-opportunity differences may relate more to education and income than to their health.

This insight then lead to quite different and more effective communications.

Should we have similar types of people in the focus group?

Conversely, matching can also highlight opportunity.

If you were looking to boost your mortgage lending, matching like-people with like-people can uncover common difficulties in saving and in meeting lending criteria, identifying appropriate communication approaches.

Mixing different types of people may, in contrast, lessen the understanding of the motivations and needs of those with average incomes, if those with average incomes were in a group mixed with people who earn seven figure incomes each year.

Choosing the approach that will work best for you

Mixing or matching to make focus groups more effective depends on the products or services from which you want to increase your sales.  In mixed or in matched focus groups, our accurate identification of your customers’ motivations can help you to further strengthen your business.

If you’d like to discuss how we can help you by using focus groups that reveal customer or prospective customer motivations to strengthen your communications and so results, please call or email Philip Derham now.

How knowing what they think enables more business.

We see our customers all the time – in our stores, in our branches, on the phone, in their emails, on social media, in the daily or regular customer reports, in the Net Promoter Score scores, and particularly in the profit and loss accounts.

So we think we know them.  We think we know what motivates them and market to our thoughts and get commensurate results.

But thinking and knowing may not be not the same, as a client recently found.  Volunteers give it over 25,000 free days labour every year but the client, as any business, needs both labour and cash to operate. 

Knowing how committed their volunteers were, made the volunteers seem a perfect segment for cash donations as well, but the volunteers gave less cash than expected.

We ran focus groups with the volunteers and clarified their motivations, which explained why the marketing had generated less than expected.

Post-focus group result?  A revised marketing campaign that appealed to the volunteers’ actual motivations.

So, if identifying your customers’ actual motivations can further strengthen your marketing, please call or email me, and we can discuss the next steps to your strengthened results, just as the client has done.