Category Archives: News and updates

News and updates, Derham Marketing Research’s blog

Identifying customer opportunities quickly.

Life changes continually.  Melbourne was last year’s AFL premiers, and now is this year’s…?

Life for customers can be much the same.  Understanding customers’ changing attitudes and intentions can help you to respond tactically, and help to keep your longer-term strategy current, even as people’s thoughts, views, practices, and purchases change over time.

You can get that needed customer understanding by looking at your sales patterns, referring to external economic reports, or by asking customers directly.

To help you to ask customers directly, cost-effectively, we have developed a rapid, cost-effective Key Customer Insights Monitor™ that establishes customers’ satisfaction, activities, intentions, recommendation practice, and current mindset. 

You can use our online Key Customer Insights Monitor™ to understand your own customers, or to understand the views, purchases, practices and needs of a wider audience of customers and prospective customers, as you require.

The Key Customer Insights Monitor™ approach works effectively across sectors and we can quickly tailor it to your specific products and services.  To know how we can get you the business-building insights from your customers, or your prospective customers, that will enable you to market more effectively to them, call Philip Derham on 0414 543 765 or email him at derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au

A video explanation that customer satisfaction varies with customers’ happiness.

Customer satisfaction measures assume that customers report their satisfaction based on their actual experiences, so the results are comparable over time. But satisfaction measures can also be influenced by customers’ states of mind when surveyed, as this 1 minute 36 second video explains. Just click on this link to know more:

https://youtu.be/ZTaZzI3qxMk

If you’d like to know more, call Philip Derham on 0414 543 765 or email him at derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au

Customers’ happiness influences their satisfaction with your products and services.

You may, like many others, measure your customers’ satisfaction with your products or services.  Underlying the satisfaction measures is the assumption that your customers report their satisfaction based on their actual experiences, so the results are comparable over time.

Satisfaction measures can also be influenced by your customers’ states of mind when they were surveyed, we’ve found.  And states of mind can be altered by external factors, such as COVID .  So, year-on-year measures may not be completely comparable, as we found in a recent survey.  In that survey, 16% of customers reported that, when surveyed, they were not happy. 

As the graph shows, unhappy customers were markedly less satisfied than were happy customers.

The number of unhappy customers in any one year could vary your end-satisfaction results, quite independently of how you have dealt with your customers.

So, if sharpened satisfaction KPIs could assist you, call Philip Derham on 0414 543 765 or email him at derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au to discuss the next steps to ensure reliable year-on-year satisfaction measures.

Saving time and money in getting insights from your customer research! 

Are your sales or enquiries are less than you want?

Customers and prospects may be going cautiously, concerned about increased personal and household costs, and the new Government’s impact on enquiries and sales is yet to be seen. 

But now, your need is to increase enquiries and sales or enquiry conversions.  Your decisions on how you can increase and convert will be stronger when you have clear insights into your customers’ (and prospects’) views, intentions, expectations, and current needs.

These insights can be quickly understood via a survey.  And in thinking about the outcomes you need from a survey, it can help to ask whether what you need to know is unique, or is it what you need to know similar to the insights others in your industry have also needed to know?

If your circumstances are unique, you will need a specifically written survey.

If the insights you need are common, a cost-effective option may be to use an existing relevant survey, tweaking it to your specific needs.  This can be quicker, cheaper and as effective.  

Our 20 Questions, One Topic Monitors© are pre-written surveys that can provide clear insights to your marketing and to your messaging, to your customer needs and their intentions, and their satisfaction and recommendation practices, and more.  The insights we can get can be from your own customers or customers from a broader pool, as you need. 

To find out more, email or ring Philip Derham now – derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au or on 0414 543 65.

Australia’s most scammed! Perception and reality!

This blog is about Australians’ most scammed people. 

The perception is that older people are more easier scammed than are other people.  But as a market researcher and an insight professional, we look at the facts before assuming the perception is the reality.

The facts are, according to Scamwatch, for the 3 months January to March 2022 that 55,904 Australians reported being scammed. Each who was scammed lost, on average,$2,991.

See the full story at: https://youtu.be/iMoXs5F3Sng5F3Sng or read more below.

Men lost on average $4,399 while women lost only $1,730 each on average.

But the biggest losers were those aged 25 to 34 years.  On average each young person lost $10,941 while the older people (those aged 65 years plus) lost on average only $2,364 each

The State that was most profitable for scammers was Queensland.  In Queensland, each scammed person lost an average of $7,667.

In comparison, people in NSW and in Victoria were more cautious.  The people scammed in NSW lost on average only $1,856 and the penny-pinching Victorians lost on average only $1,676.

When we put this data together, the picture then is that the reality of people scammed are young people, people living in Queensland, and men.

This is quite a different reality to the perception that the most scammed people are the poor old things.

Accordingly, our recommendation is always to test your perceptions before you launch into expensive campaigns, so you ensure that the market you’re talking to, is really the market that is there.

If we can help you to identify and confirm the details of the market that is, rather than the market of perceptions, please call or email me.  My contact details are:

T:  0414 543 765 E:  derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au

The danger in thinking you are like your customers! How we can save you from costly marketing mistakes!

“One of the stranger aspects of most bank ads is the assumption that you actually have any money saved .” so wrote a journalist on Monday.

Yet the reality is that many Australians do have money saved. The Australian Bureau of Statistics reports that the value of Australian household savings and deposits rose 3% in the December 2021 quarter, and were worth $1,465 billion.

Whether the journalist was just reflecting what they saw in the mirror or commenting without fact-checking was unclear.

Market to your customers, not your image

But as there are enough Australians with savings, it profits the banks to advertise to them.

Similarly, when you know who your customers and who your prospects are, your marketing and business growth will be stronger than if you just look in the mirror and assume. We can tell you your customers’ personal characteristics, value, and what will motivate them to use you or to do more with you.

To act on facts, call Philip Derham (0414 543 765) or email him now, at derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au to get the customer insights that will ensure your more effective market growth.

Getting answers that give you the insights you need – quickly.

Long surveys that ask all the questions you ever wanted answered are time consuming for the participants and give them little immediate benefit.  As a result., people can start and then just stop.  And so deprive you of knowledge of their motives, needs, and activities with you or with your competitors.

But there is a solution.

Most people will share their views if the surveys are short and the questions relevant to them. 

Our 20 Questions One Topic Monitors™. have been specifically developed to be short so people will make the time to answer them, but are still detailed enough to tell you what you need to know.

These short, comprehensive, pre-written online surveys get fast, detailed answers because participants can do them where and when they want.  And on their mobiles, laptops, PCs or even on their tablets.  Our 20 Questions One Topic Monitors™ combine the sharpness of yes/no closed-ended answers with the extra depth we get when people add in their own answers.

When we survey your customers, we can pre-include what you already know and need not aggravatingly ask again.  These known details can be your customers’ age, or gender, or home area, and, if you have pre-segmented your customers by their business value, we can add that too.

The 20 Questions One Topic Monitors™. process is easy. 

We discuss your needs with you, advise the relevant 20 Questions One Topic Monitor to you.  You agree and supply your customer sample.  We supply the personalised survey and email people from your customer database.  We receive all responses and report the findings quickly.  And if you need to know about people who are not yet your customers, we can survey people from appropriate lists too.

To know more about our cost-effective 20 Questions One Topic Monitors™, call or email me now – (+61) 0414 543 765 or derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au

Philip Derham

Director,

Derham Insights Research

Getting recommendations to grow your business – the 2 minute video.

A two minute view that explains why, as many situations when people chat about products, services, finances, these occasions are not formal recommendation situations, and so may not be reported in surveys seeking formal practice.

Instead, when we research these informal occasions, the results can enable you to market such informal occasions to bring in new business. More in the video.

If you would like to know more, please contact Philip Derham.

E: derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au

T: (+61) 0414 543 765

Getting recommendations to grow your business.

Getting current customers to recommend your products or services can be a key objective in driving sales from new customers.

We often survey businesses’ current customers to find out how satisfied they are, and if they have or will recommend the business to others.  Such surveys are formal measures of sentiment and intention.  

Businesses can also benefit from exploring customers’ more relaxed, less formal activities that are effectively recommendations but which few consider or report to be recommendations.   When you know about these casual situations, your marketing can encourage what’s said in those to generate more business.

The less formal measures – moderated individual discussions or group discussions – seek to understand how people are, when not in formal “I recommend” situations. Such occasions can be when family, friends, workmates or neighbours are chatting or even just looking around, in someone else’s home.

In these casual chats, people talk about what’s happened, what they’re planning or are doing.  Or even the need for an extra bathroom (the 7 am congestion!!!) and where to get the money for that.

Sometimes, just seeing someone else’s new dishwasher or sofa can start a chat about why it was needed. 

The chat can morph into whether the new one is better than yours, was it pricey, or where did you find it – online or in-store – and more.  These casual chats are not “please recommend” occasions, but can be thought-starters to a “maybe I should upgrade too” state of mind that you can market to, stimulating more business.
 
If you’d like to know how these less formal techniques can assist you to generate new customers, please call or email me.  My details are below.

T:   0414 543 765
E:   derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au
LI:   linkedin.com/in/philipderham/

Answers that strengthen your business (2).

Direct dealing with customers helps to understand their needs and regular customer surveys further strengthen that knowledge, enabling you to better satisfy those customer needs. (The read follows below, or you can see the same on the video.)

Today, surveys need to be written for easy completion on mobile phones. Questions with pre-set answers can help as customers can easily select one or more of the pre-set answers.

Getting the right options in pre-set lists is not always easy, as customer needs are not always clearly expressed. As an example, a client list of answer options included 7 perceived main customer needs, which were to be measured for satisfaction and ranked in importance to the customers.

To be sure these 7 perceived needs were customer needs, in the survey, we first asked customers to type in their main needs of the business. We found that:

* Unprompted, customers cited 6 main needs they had for dealing with the business.

* Of these, 4 main reasons were also on the perceived needs, pre-set answer list.

* But 2 of the unprompted needs customers mentioned had not been known to the business.

* Unprompted, 3 main needs the business thought were important were not mentioned by customers.

With this extra knowledge, we were able to measure and rank customer motivations as the customers saw them, and so were able to provide clear directions for the business. Thus while pre-set answer choices can make for quick and easy surveys, you need to first establish what is important to your customers, and then measure those. Our surveys are expressly designed to do that, so that our findings strengthen your customer-related decisions.  

To know more, please call or email Philip Derham – 0414 543 765 or derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au

Answers that strengthen your business.

Direct dealing with customers helps to understand their needs and regular customer surveys further strengthen that knowledge, enabling you to better satisfy those customer needs.

Today, surveys need to be written for easy completion on mobile phones. Questions with pre-set answers can help as customers can easily select one or more of the pre-set answers.

Getting the right options in pre-set lists is not always easy, as customer needs are not always clearly expressed. As an example, a client list of answer options included 7 perceived main customer needs, which were to be measured for satisfaction and ranked in importance to the customers.

To be sure these 7 perceived needs were customer needs, in the survey, we first asked customers to type in their main needs of the business. We found that:

·       Unprompted, customers cited 6 main needs they had for dealing with the business.

·       Of these, 4 main reasons were also on the perceived needs, pre-set answer list.

·       But 2 of the unprompted needs customers mentioned had not been known to the business.

·       Unprompted, 3 main needs the business thought were important were not mentioned by customers.

With this extra knowledge, we were able to measure and rank customer motivations as the customers saw them, and so were able to provide clear directions for the business. 

Thus while pre-set answer choices can make for quick and easy surveys, you need to first establish what is important to your customers, and then measure those. Our surveys are expressly designed to do that, so that our findings strengthen your customer-related decisions. 

To know more, please call or email Philip Derham – derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au or 0414 543 765.

But I’ve just bought it!  Why you need customer research findings before trying to sell more!

Three months ago, I bought a webcam circle light, so my Zoom sessions were better lit, and a lapel microphone, so I could make clearer sounding videos. 

Both were bought from online stores, with positive brands.

But, since the purchases, the online stores have emailed me at least weekly, offering to sell me another circle light or another microphone.

But with only one voice and one face, I don’t need more microphones or lights. 

And the constant sales emails of lights and microphones made me wonder about the quality of what I’d bought and the worth of the store brands.  And whether in future, I’d be better shopping elsewhere.

Then I realised.

The problem was that the sales follow-up program noted what I’d bought and thought those items were my interest, and so continued trying to sell those to me.  Possibly, this approach could work were the purchases chocolate or coffee.  But not for more of the same equipment.

And the same would be true were the products mortgages or other loans, specific use products or services.

What was needed was an understanding of why I’d bought the items and what were the relevant ancillary products or services that would complement the items. 

Here, a short piece of customer research would have identified why the items were bought and what they were being used for.  And then more relevant sales messages (a greenscreen for the background, chairs that didn’t squeak, light-softening blinds, stands for scripts, production software, etc.) could have been sent -and additional sales obtained. We can help you to identify additional sales opportunities after an initial sale, by researching your customers.  If you’d like to know more, please call me on 0414 543 765 or email me at derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au

Should we have the same types or different types of people in your focus groups?

Should we mix or match when running online or in-person focus groups for you?

Mixing different types of people in a group can expose new business opportunities as they discuss their different experiences and ideas.  Or the mix of different types of people can silence some, depending on the topic, and so lessening the insights you will obtain.

Similarly, a focus group of the same sorts of people can have them discuss your concerns in depth can reveal new needs or opportunities, as they delve deeper into their common experiences.

The 2 minute video (below) discusses the benefits you’d get from each approach.

Our skill in identifying new business opportunities for you comes from deciding whether to mix or to match the types of people who will take part in your online or in-person focus groups.

If we can help you get more from your focus groups, please:

Call Philip Derham on 0414 543 765, or

email him at derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au

Customer databases can reveal great opportunity!

Facts that database analyses identify can highlight new and strengthened business opportunity, we’ve found.

As examples, a farmers’ publication had a very high capital city readership, which seemed odd.  Or some discount card users are regular shoppers at the stores, while others appear to visit rarely, or that a financial institution had more mortgages in Sydney’s western suburbs but more customers in Canberra.

Database facts like these can suggest groups you can market to, or may suggest the benefits of reviewing your distribution, product, messaging and offer, or more.

But the missing bit of knowledge is the “Why?” 

Database analyses on their own can’t explain why there were high city sales, nor why some customers are frequent shoppers and others are not.  The database analyses can show you the “who” but not the “why” that explain the customer motivations.

We can add that “Why” element and so help you make your marketing campaign more motivational. 

And finding that why can reveal unexpected but profitable markets – city dwellers reading the farmers’ publication were intending hobby farmers.  They were a good market for preparatory goods like small, city-garage size tractors [1] bought in anticipation of buying the farm.  And this knowledge gave the publication a new range of advertising customers.

When your database analyses reveal groups of potential opportunity, ensure that you know the motivational “why” too, so your campaigns motivate most effectively.  We can help you to know the “why”. 

If you’d like to know more, please call me on 0414 543 765 or email Philip Derham at derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au

[1] Cited with client approval

Customer databases can reveal great opportunity – the video!

The facts database analyses identify can highlight new and strengthened business opportunity – for example, some are frequent discount card users.  Other loyalty card customers appear to visit rarely.

Continue reading on the next post or watch the summary in this 2 minute 35 second video:

https://youtu.be/17ZG5pACX-c

Whether you have watched the video summary or read the longer next post, to ensure your next campaign motivates most effectively, call or email Philip Derham now –

0414 543 765

derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au

Are happy people more satisfied customers? And does that affect your satisfaction KPIs?

Your age suggests your happiness level, the HILDA happiness curve* suggests.

In general, if you are:

* Young – you probably self-describe as being happy all or most of the time.

* Middle-aged – you probably self-describe as being happy none, a bit or just some of the time.

* Older – you probably self-describe as being happy all or most of the time.

Of course, these are broad labels and each of us can be happy, or not happy, regardless of our age, though the data shows that this general thesis holds.

But given the extraordinary COVID-19-induced life changes of the last two years, we wondered if self-perceptions of happiness had also changed. And then whether changes in the base levels of happiness would influence other attitudes, such as satisfaction with the organisations you deal with.

A happiness and satisfaction relationship?

As one of the KPIs we measure is customer satisfaction, if changes in customers’ self-perceptions of their happiness influences their assessments of satisfaction with the organisations they deal with, then that could alter satisfaction KPIs over time.

So to see what, if any influence, self-perceptions of happiness had on other measures, we tested this by asking thousands of customers about their satisfaction with organisations they dealt with regularly.

Then, we asked about products and services they used, established their personal characteristics, and finished with the HILDA happiness self-perception question.

What we found out about satisfaction.

What emerged from the questioning was that the proportions of customers who said they were satisfied with the organisations was the same regardless of their personal characteristics. The personal characteristics included age, gender, household type, personal occupation, household income and home ownership.

What we found out about happiness and satisfaction.

We then looked at those who said they were happy all or most of the time (the happy people) and found their satisfied proportions matched the all-customers’ satisfaction proportions. We also looked at those customers who rated themselves as not happy. We found again that there was no difference between their satisfaction levels and the overall satisfaction levels of all customers.

The conclusions.

Accordingly, from this dataset, we can state that customers’ happiness does not influence their satisfaction with the organisations asked about. Rather, the satisfaction KPIs measure customers’ satisfaction with the organisations’ performance at the time of measure and does not reflect extrinsic factors such as the customers’ happiness self-perceptions. This indicates that satisfaction KPIs are accurate guides to customers’ views about the organisation, whether they are happy or not.

So, if in these uncertain times, knowing how satisfied your customers are with your organisation, can strengthen your business, please call Philip Derham – 0414 543 765 – or email him at derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au. Then we can establish the satisfaction KPIs that will help you.

* Source: Melbourne Institute’s Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey.

Satisfaction and recommendation – KPIs

Australian banks measure customer satisfaction and customer recommendation intention. We find out whether these two KPIs could usefully be combined into one for easier management response.

The back of a woman taking money out of an ATM.

Satisfaction and Recommendation as KPIs

Banks in Australia receive regular public and private results from customer satisfaction surveys. These surveys measure customers’ attitudes to their recent customer-bank interactions.
The banks can use the public domain results to distinguish positively one brand from another if the product range is similar. These results are also used to advocate the benefits of banking with mutually owned banks and credit unions, as their customer satisfaction results are usually markedly higher than those of other banks.

Public and private customer satisfaction measures are also used as key performance indicators (KPIs) in assessing staff and corporate performance overall.
The Net Promoter Score (NPS) measures of future recommendation intention are also significant KPIs. The NPS uses a 0 to 10 scale as it asks customers how likely they are to recommend the business (in this case, banks) in the future.

""

Both are reported as separate measures. But there can be an assumption that strong customer satisfaction will lead to stronger future recommendation intention and so a strengthened business. And if this hypothesis were to hold, would there be an advantage to the bank end users of the two separate customer satisfaction and NPS measures if they could be merged into one single metric? The single metric utility was noted by a manager juggling many, and one less was an appeal!

In this preliminary study, we reviewed one bank’s customer satisfaction because of its past performance and the bank’s customers’ intention to recommend it in the future. In the light of actual data, we considered whether these two key performance indicators should be retained as separate measures of different customer mindsets or could usefully be merged into a single continuum measure, as a single measure may make it easier for banks to respond to their results.

The findings

1. Nine in ten were satisfied!

We looked at three recent bank customer satisfaction online surveys.

In each, the customers were asked about their activities in the last three months with the bank and were asked to rate that on the five-point scale of very satisfied, satisfied, neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, dissatisfied, and very dissatisfied.

All surveys returned very high net satisfaction results.

In each survey, nine in ten customers were satisfied (very satisfied and satisfied combined) with their activities with the bank overall.  The individual survey customer satisfaction levels were 88%, 89%, and 92%.

2. The Net Promoter Score scale findings

We then reviewed the NPS scale results from the three surveys.  We used the NPS 0 to 10 point scale, rather than its summation of customers, which the NPS describes as promoters, passives, or detractors[1].  We did so as we were comparing scale results rather than specific pre-set methodologies.

At the 9 and 10 levels of the NPS scale, 27%, 37%, and 20% of bank customers said they would recommend the bank in the future.

When we combined the 7, 8, 9, or 10 selectors (equating the “very satisfied” or “satisfied” scale points), we found that half the bank’s customers said they are likely to recommend it in the next year (54%, 65%, and 42%).

We then looked at customers who were satisfied and recommenders at the 9 or 10 scale level, and the results scarcely differed.  We found that 26%, 36%, and 19% of the customers were satisfied with the bank and intended to recommend it at 9 or 10 levels.  The NPS scale 9 or 10 results on their own were 27%, 37%, and 20%.  Again, little difference between the single or the combined group.

We also tested the inclusion of customers who answered 7 or 8 on the NPS scale and were satisfied with the bank.  We found that about half the customers were both satisfied with the bank and intended to recommend it in the next year (47%, 61%, and 40% – again similar to the 7 to 10 NPS-only measures of 54%, 65%, and 42%).

3. But does intention follow with action?

The question we were considering was whether satisfaction and recommendation intent answers could be combined into a single new metric.

Related

Look Beyond Product for Drivers of B2B Satisfaction and Value

Our data was not longitudinal, so we were unable to see if intention did follow into practice, but we had past recommendation data for one of the surveys and looked at that.  In that survey, customers were asked about their past recommendations, and only 32% of bank customers said they had recommended the bank in any way in the last year.

As 31% of all customers were satisfied and had made a recommendation in the last year group, the connection between recommendation past practice and recommendation future intention is limited to a relatively small group of perhaps a third of all the bank’s customers.

Only 17% of the bank customers had recommended and intend to recommend at the 9 or 10 on the NPS scale).  Including those who answered 7 or 8 as well, this group increased to 23% of all the bank’s customers.  Again, this level is very similar to the proportions that were satisfied and would recommend in the next year (27%, 37%, and 20% at the NPS 9 or 10 level).

Essentially, there was a core group of about one in four customers who were satisfied, were past recommenders, and were likely to future recommenders.

""

Merge into one metric or continue as two?

The data from these three surveys indicate low associations between satisfaction, intention to recommend in the future, and past recommendation.  Comparatively, few customers were satisfied, had recommended, and intended to recommend in the future.  This suggests that the best measure practice in the Australian banking consumer customer market is to continue with the two measures as KPIs.  That is, the customer satisfaction with past bank activity and future recommendation intention (via the NPS) should remain as separate measures.

Satisfaction and Recommendation: Should 2 KPIs Be Merged Into 1? | GreenBook

Thoughts, words and business opportunity

Thoughts and words give insight into customer motivations, actions and potential business outcomes.

But words can differ from thoughts. Unless you measure both, you may miss business opportunities. And when researching your customers, you need to be aware of their words and their thoughts.

Aligning both provides better business outcomes, as this 2 minute video details – https://tinyurl.com/thoughtsandwords


Our research tools and techniques ensure words match closely to thoughts – and so to subsequent behaviour.

We can help you to strengthen your business – by finding the words expressed, and the thoughts unsaid, that do influence behaviour.

To know more, please contact me, Philip Derham, at Derham Insights Research – derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au or 0414 543 765.

The March 2021 retail sales data – and opportunities it shows

Yesterday, the Australian Bureau of Statistics released its March 2021 quarter retail sales data.

In this 2 minute video, Philip Derham notes key findings and the need to ensure that marketing activities are both sector-relevant and appeal to the current shopper motivations.

The different shopper motivations now are exemplified in the marked increase in spending in the leisure/pleasure cafes, restaurants and takeaway food sector, and the decline in the supermarkets and liquor sector sales.

https://tinyurl.com/RetailSalesOpportunities

How to make customer-wanted shorter surveys give you what you need, too.

Our research on survey completions, over the last decade, has found that online surveys longer than 12 minutes on average have higher dropouts. People just stop, regardless of the incentive to complete the survey, if they are too long.

Knowing this, we plan our online surveys to average 12 minutes or less.

But the problem can often be that you need to know more about your customers or your staff and their needs. A 12-minute survey can be too short to ask all you need to know. 

One solution is for us to write the long survey that answers all your questions. Then divide it into smaller surveys, and when those shorter surveys are finished, we combine the answers to tell you all you need.

But an effective, additional way to get more from your online surveys is to include the information you already know about your customers (or staff). We already upload their names and email addresses, so each customer or staff member receives a personal invitation to complete the survey. And each invitation has its own individual, unique survey link. This stops them doing the survey more than once.

And this allows us to add extra information for later analysis when we upload the email addresses. We can upload details from your loyalty program or from your customer database or staff list.

We can upload the standard demographics of age, gender, and home postcode. Doing that saves three questions – and about a minute in survey time.

Then, we can upload, from your records, the number of coffees they bought from you last week, or the value of their cash investments with you, or the value of their loans with you, or how long it has been since they last shopped with you, or their rank or length of service with you. 

And more – up to 200 descriptors which we can then use to identify opportunity and areas of strength or segments that need to be strengthened. And all without adding another question the participant needs to answer.

Hence, shorter but efficient, effective surveys.

If we can help you further build your business by running shorter surveys, rich with pre-loaded, pre-known details, giving you better insights, please call or email Philip Derham, derhamp@derhamresearch.com.au or call 0414 543 765.

Satisfaction and recommendation.

Three key metrics – customer satisfaction in dealing with your organisation, the Net Promoter Score, and recommendation measures, when combined, provide clear KPIs.

In this 2 minute video, Philip Derham of Derham Insights Research explains how its Satisfaction NPS Recommender Monitor findings enable you to further strengthen your business performance and profitability.

https://tinyurl.com/SatisfactionAndRecommendation